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venerdì 2 dicembre 2016

Caught in the crossfire, driven to hunger, held as human shields – civilians trapped in Mosul face a living nightmare, as coalition forces attempt to topple the last urban stronghold of ISIS in Iraq, while meting out sectarian punishments of their own. The battle to retake Mosul, captured by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) in summer 2014, began in October when Iraqi security forces, Shia and tribal militias, and the Kurdish Peshmerga launched an audacious ground assault with British and US-led air support........

A family walks past a destroyed M-1 Abrhams tank in Gogjali.  © Gabriel Romero / Global Look Press via ZUMA Press


Caught in the crossfire, driven to hunger, held as human shields – civilians trapped in Mosul face a living nightmare, as coalition forces attempt to topple the last urban stronghold of ISIS in Iraq, while meting out sectarian punishments of their own.
The battle to retake Mosul, captured by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL) in summer 2014, began in October when Iraqi security forces, Shia and tribal militias, and the Kurdish Peshmerga launched an audacious ground assault with British and US-led air support.
Fierce IS resistance and concern for the estimated 1.5 million civilians still trapped inside the city, however, have stalled the operation’s progress, casting doubt over the swift liberation that Baghdad and coalition strategists had hoped for. 
Speaking to RT’s Rob Edwards, Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, chair of the AMAR Foundation and Britain’s trade envoy to Iraq, says Mosul’s civilians now face a desperate humanitarian situation.
“They will pour out of Mosul traumatized, some of them having been bombed, some of them having lost limbs and there may be one and a half million people in that condition,” said Nicholson. “So inevitably there’s going to be a huge amount of damaged humans.
“AMAR specializes in that, it’s exactly why we exist – it’s to help people when they’re in desperate situations and to patch them up as fast as possible, save their lives and to get them into secure locations.”
The AMAR Foundation, established in response to Saddam Hussein’s persecution of the Marsh Arabs, launched its Mosul Appeal in October to provide medical services and education to Iraq’s internally displaced.
“The fall of Mosul is a terrifying prospect for the inhabitants of Mosul and AMAR has to be ready to save as many lives as possible,” Nicholson added. 
Iraqi people flee the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul in al-Samah neighborhood, Iraq December 2, 2016. © Mohammed Salem
The Liberal Democrat peer is unambiguous in her assessment of what lies in store for Islamic State’s captive subjects.
“The Islamic State have captured and kidnapped a lot of people. Some of them were already residents of Mosul, others not residents of Mosul, and they’re really using them as human sacrifices.
“They are using them to demonstrate their extreme cruelty, and they’re using cruelty to cow a resident population into submission and to frighten away others.
“They are also using cruelty to attract global sadists who come to practice their sadism. There’s a small proportion of the human race that are born sadists, sadly, or born without any understanding of inflicting pain on others. They don’t have that feeling in them.
“So it’s not really human shields that are being used. Now, I’m sorry to say, it’s basically human sacrifices and those people will probably die. But many others will escape. And we must save as many lives as possible in the AMAR Foundation.” 
© Dabiq / Global Look Press via ZUMA Press
Atrocities committed by IS militants against civilians are well documented, but a growing body of evidence suggests torture, home demolitions, and extrajudicial killings are not confined to jihadist ranks.
Amnesty International researcher Diana Eltahawy and her team recently uncovered evidence of Iraqi federal police apparently executing Sunni Arab villagers in revenge for IS attacks – allegations vehemently denied by the Iraqi government, which has refused to launch an inquiry.
“In one particular incident, on the 21st of August, we found that armed men wearing federal police uniforms tortured and killed at least six villagers in the south of Mosul on suspicion that they might have had links with the armed group calling itself the Islamic State,”Eltahawy explained.
“According to information that we have, these were villagers who had stayed behind while fighters had moved the majority of the civilian population out of the area, so Iraqi forces present on the ground appear to have been suspicious that anyone who remained behind might have been a fighter.
“But these are individuals who did not pose any threat, they were villagers who handed themselves over to the Iraqi forces, who carried white flags and who lifted their shirts to show they didn’t have explosive belts. And after that they were beaten, they had their beards pulled and in one case burned before a group of them were taken aside and shot dead.”
Iraq is a majority Shia country, but Mosul and its hinterland are home to many millions of Sunni Arabs. The Islamic State has sought to exploit sectarian resentment among Sunnis who have been effectively disenfranchised by Baghdad’s Shia dominated establishment.
Revelations of sectarian abuse perpetrated by Mosul’s supposed liberators do not bode well for reconciliation.
Tallha Abdulrazaq, a researcher at the University of Exeter’s Strategy & Security Institute, says the blame for this simmering resentment lies with the policies of former Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and his successor Haider al-Abadi’s failure to address Iraq’s burning civil rights question.
“The issue here is that after 2008, the Maliki government marginalized the Sunni Arab community. So right now the Sunni Arab community are thinking ‘why should we put our necks out on the line only for you to revert back to your sectarian policies?’
“So even with Daesh [IS] being defeated, and even considering that they have a lack of support among the vast majority of Sunni Arabs, Sunni Arabs have no interest in fighting them because, frankly, they see the Iraqi government and, to a lesser degree the Peshmerga units that are doing this, razing homes, they see them as being the same as Daesh, not any better.”
Abdulrazaq says a far-reaching political solution is required to work in tandem with the Iraqi government’s military strategy, otherwise the conditions that allowed IS to grow and maintain its grip for so long will remain unchanged.
“If we restore equal rights to all Iraqis, whether they’re Kurdish, Sunni, whether they’re Arab Sunnis, whether they’re Shia Arabs, whether they’re Shia Turkman, it doesn’t really matter, so long as they’re treated equally as Iraqi citizens, we will have a solution to Daesh. Right now, that doesn’t exist.”
“The best case scenario is for the Iraqi military, including the popular mobilization forces and the tribal militias, to stop any and all atrocities right now, because if they manage to get the civilians on board, if the people of Mosul and the Iraqi community, the Sunni Arab community especially, manage to see this is different from Falluja, this is different from Tikrit and all these other places where atrocities have been committed, there’s a chance at some kind of reconciliation.
“But that’s very unlikely to happen. So, I’m afraid all I have for you is a worst-case scenario – that atrocities continue, sectarian rule is restored over the city of Mosul and the threat of Daesh doesn’t disappear – it remains because they have no partners on the ground who are able to effectively neutralize them, as happened in 2008 with Al-Qaeda.”
A man purported to be the reclusive leader of the militant Islamic State Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi making what would have been his first public appearance, at a mosque in the centre of Iraq's second city, Mosul, according to a video recording posted on the Internet on July 5, 2014. © Reuters
The death of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s so-called caliphate as a territorial edifice within Iraq will no doubt strike a devastating blow to the jihadist group’s morale and global reach. Its survival as a guerrilla force, however, capable of continuing some form of asymmetric warfare, remains a pervasive fear.
“The best case scenario would be if the vile Baghdadi drops down dead, as it were, and all his people ran away,” said Nicholson. “The question is where they run to.”
“The worst case scenario is when they run into the undergrowth and they become sleepers in differed cities and towns and tribes and villages throughout Iraq and, in that sense, never give up.”

da "rt.com"

The rise of Donald Trump and Britain’s Brexit vote come at “the most dangerous time in the history of the human race,” renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has warned. Writing in an op-ed for the Guardian newspaper, the Cambridge professor said the political shift shows the majority of people are sick of the status quo and felt they had been “abandoned by their leaders.”.....

British scientist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking. © Toby Melville


The rise of Donald Trump and Britain’s Brexit vote come at “the most dangerous time in the history of the human race,” renowned theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has warned.
Writing in an op-ed for the Guardian newspaper, the Cambridge professor said the political shift shows the majority of people are sick of the status quo and felt they had been “abandoned by their leaders.”
“It was, everyone seems to agree, the moment when the forgotten spoke, finding their voices to reject the advice and guidance of experts and the elite everywhere.
“For me, the really concerning aspect of this is that now, more than at any time in our history, our species needs to work together,” he added.
Hawking says the world is facing crippling challenges, including climate change, food production, overpopulation, the decimation of other species, epidemic disease and acidification of the oceans.
“Together, they are a reminder that we are at the most dangerous moment in the development of humanity.
“We can do this [overcome the challenges], I am an enormous optimist for my species; but it will require the elites, from London to Harvard, from Cambridge to Hollywood, to learn the lessons of the past year. To learn above all a measure of humanity.”
He added: “We now have the technology to destroy the planet on which we live, but have not yet developed the ability to escape it.
“Perhaps in a few hundred years, we will have established human colonies amid the stars, but right now we only have one planet, and we need to work together to protect it.”
Hawking also warned that artificial intelligence and increasing automation is going to decimate middle class jobs and worsen inequality, and risks creating significant political upheaval.
“The automation of factories has already decimated jobs in traditional manufacturing, and the rise of artificial intelligence is likely to extend this job destruction deep into the middle classes, with only the most caring, creative or supervisory roles remaining.
“With not only jobs but entire industries disappearing, we must help people to retrain for a new world and support them financially while they do so,” he added.
It is not the first time Hawking has shared his opinions about Trump. In an interview with ITV earlier in the year, Hawking referred to the president-elect as “a demagogue who seems to appeal to the lowest common denominator.”

da "rt.com"

While Syrian government forces are retaking neighborhood after neighborhood in east Aleppo, thousands of civilians have seized the opportunity to flee the violence. Locals shared their memories of what they left behind with RT. ......


 
 
 

While Syrian government forces are retaking neighborhood after neighborhood in east Aleppo, thousands of civilians have seized the opportunity to flee the violence. Locals shared their memories of what they left behind with RT. 
RT’s Lizzie Phelan went to a former food market turned makeshift camp where some east Aleppo residents have fled en route to safer places within and outside Syria. A generator has been set up in the camp to let people charge their phones so that they can try to contact friends and relatives who can help them get further away from the conflict-torn area.
“They were shelling in our area, but we didn’t leave our home. It wasn’t until my home was destroyed and my children were injured that I said I could no longer live there and I left,” one woman named Fatima told RT.
Her husband, who sustained a head injury, is disoriented and desperately needs medical help.
Some of the people light fires to try to keep warm, as it is freezing cold in the region at the moment. Cold, however, isn’t the only life-threatening issue – despite fleeing the terror, many suffer from severe malnutrition and most of the kids have yellowish skin and can barely move.
One of the mothers told RT that it was the rebels who took the food from them in eastern Aleppo.
“The prices for everything were so high! When the aid would come, they [the rebels] would take it and keep it for themselves. They stole it from us. None of my kids have eaten for three days, they are suffering, and the journey here was so difficult!” Majdolene said.
Many people had to walk for three hours to reach the makeshift camp.
“When I heard the road was open, they told us not to go, ‘they will shoot you and you kids,’ but I said, let them shoot us, I don’t care, it’s better than staying [in east Aleppo],” Majdolene emotionally told RT.
“My friends said, ‘let’s find a car.’ I said, ‘if I don’t find a car, I will go crawling on my hands and knees,’” she added.
It was not the first time Majdolene had attempted to flee with her five children. The last time, the militants caught her and took her ID. The woman’s family has been separated by the fighting, with her husband joining the Free Syrian Army and her brother serving in the Syrian military. She says her husband tried to force her to bring her brother to him but she refused despite beatings.
Majdolene’s isn’t the only family split by war. Teenage Ahmad’s parents are just 50 kilometers away, but he can’t go see them, as Al Bab is under Islamic State (formerly ISIS/ISIL) control now.
“We will stay here until God helps us,” the boy told RT.
da "rt.com"
Reuters is reporting that the travel agency has been held up in the past and is particularly popular with Asian customers who deal in cash transactions.
Paris police have tweeted that six people have been evacuated from the office. The gunman remains inside, however.

Scores of military veterans have begun arriving to take part in the North Dakota pipeline protest, with hundreds, possibly thousands more expected, including a US congresswoman. Members of the group Veterans for Standing Rock, organized on Facebook, have come to support Native American and environmental protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over 2,000 veterans have pledged their support, with the step coming as law enforcement authorities increase their efforts to crack down on the protest. Hundreds have been arriving at a protest camp on Friday, according to Reuters.......

Veterans have a confrontation with police on Backwater bridge during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., December 1, 2016. © Stephanie Keith


Scores of military veterans have begun arriving to take part in the North Dakota pipeline protest, with hundreds, possibly thousands more expected, including a US congresswoman. 
Members of the group Veterans for Standing Rock, organized on Facebook, have come to support Native American and environmental protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over 2,000 veterans have pledged their support, with the step coming as law enforcement authorities increase their efforts to crack down on the protest. Hundreds have been arriving at a protest camp on Friday, according to Reuters.
“The militarized police paid for by tax dollars ... is unconstitutional,”Ashleigh Jennifer Parker, a former member of the Coast Guard, told USA Today.
“People are being brutalized; concussion grenades are being thrown into crowds. They're spraying people, even old women, and other elders of the tribe with tear gas and pepper spray, and all of this is just unconstitutional. I can't believe the media hasn't taken more of an interest in this.”
Mark Sanderson, a former special forces soldier from Texas, told CBC News: “I bled in Iraq and you're going to threaten to shoot me on a bridge in North Dakota?”
A number of veterans have already arrived at the protest camp, including Purple Heart recipient Chris Turley.
Others charted their progress on social media.
Just a Wake Up and I'm on my way to  . This isn't about the Veterans it is about the People there.

RUSSIA..... Russian officials describe the November 2012 disturbances at prison camp No. 6 in the Urals town of Kopeisk as a violent uprising. Prisoners and their advocates say it was a desperate and peaceful protest against alleged torture and abuse. Now, although 17 defendants have been on trial in Kopeisk for more than 18 months, activists say there is little expectation that the truth -- or justice -- will emerge.....


Russian officials describe the November 2012 disturbances at prison camp No. 6 in the Urals town of Kopeisk as a violent uprising.
Prisoners and their advocates say it was a desperate and peaceful protest against alleged torture and abuse. 
Now, although 17 defendants have been on trial in Kopeisk for more than 18 months, activists say there is little expectation that the truth -- or justice -- will emerge.
“We believe that the accusations and the criminal prosecution of the prisoners is not justified because they were protesting to defend their rights, to protect themselves from torture and extortion, and they were doing it peacefully,” Aleksei Laptev, a Russian member of the European Prison Litigation Network who is monitoring the Kopeisk trial, told RFE/RL’s Russian Service.
“These facts have been established and have not, in principle, been contested. There are also two verdicts by the courts against the head of the colony, Denis Mekhanov,” he said. “Moreover, these facts have been established in a report by the presidential advisory Council on Human Rights and Civil Society.”
Former prison director Mekhanov was convicted in December 2014 of extorting prisoners and their relatives and abusing his position. He was given a three-year suspended sentence and sent home -- a verdict that activists saw as evidence of a conspiracy of prosecutors and the court to protect the defendant.
Moreover, two other former employees of the camp -- Viktor Krayev and Sergei Davletov -- were convicted on similar charges and fined 200,000 rubles ($3,100) and 300,000 rubles ($4,700), respectively.
'They Smashed My Car'
The events of late November 2012 at prison camp No. 6 (IK-6) remain murky. A tense situation in the prison had been building up for months. In June 2012, Gazeta.ru and other Russian media published scandalous reports of the alleged extortion and abuse, specifically implicating Mekhanov and former Chelyabinsk Oblast Deputy Governor Viktor Timashev, who is serving a 10-year term for bribery at IK-6. 
Relatives of prisoners learned on November 25, 2012, that something bad was going on at the prison. When they tried to reach the site, they found the road blocked by a battalion of riot police.
Those who were stopped on the road to the prison say the police suddenly began to disperse them violently.
“They smashed my car; they beat me so much that I lost consciousness twice,” says Dmitry Kolomeitsev, who is now a defendant at the trial, accused of organizing an “uprising.” “My car was smashed into pieces -- hardly anything left untouched. They claim that I attacked them and tried to run them down, the riot police. Then I supposedly got out of my car and smashed it. Even though there are clearly traces of their rubber truncheons on the car. This is in the record.”
Oksana Trufanova is a local human rights activist who was at the scene that night.
“I fell to my knees on the ice,” she recalled. “And a red-headed riot police officer attacked me. Apparently in the excitement he’d forgotten to lower his visor. He was waving his truncheon. I showed him my identification card and told him who I was. He said, ‘Get the hell out of here, rights activist! F*** off.’ Then a call came over the radio and they all turned back.”
Police at the time said that eight officers were injured in the altercation and that most of the 38 people who were arrested were “drunk.”
Meanwhile, Russian social media were flooded with images of prisoners standing on the roof of a building in front of handmade banners crafted from sheets with slogans calling for protection from torture and extortion.
Inmates stand on the roof of the prison in Kopeisk in November 2012.
Inmates stand on the roof of the prison in Kopeisk in November 2012.
A few days later, Trufanova was allowed into the prison with a group of rights monitors, including representatives of the presidential council on human rights.
“Inside the prison, there was a protest going on,” she said. “It was spontaneous and clearly hadn’t been organized by anyone. There were no telephones there. The people who say the banners were prepared in advance are lying…. That idea also arose spontaneously.”
Of the defendants in the current trial, 12 were inmates at the prison and five were among those arrested on the access road.
One of the defendants, Oleg Loktionov, was in the prison hospital when the protest broke out, recovering from a suicide attempt. He had been serving his time peacefully until June 2012 when he witnessed the fatal beating of prisoner Nikolai Korovkin and sent a written account of the incident to government rights monitors.
Activist Trufanova says the charges against Loktionov and the other prisoners are retribution for their defiance.
“When the investigators came to the prison, Mekhanov hadn’t been fired yet,” she said. “When they said, ‘Guys, make a list of those who you think organized the protest and took part in it,’ the…prison officials just made a list of the ‘complainers’ and handed it over. Luckily, they didn’t charge all 200 ‘complainers,’ but just the most active ones.”
She notes that prisoner and now defendant Yevgeny Terekhin was among those charged, even though he was confined to an isolation cell at the time.

“They didn’t care that he was in solitary confinement at the time and had no idea what was going on,” Trufanova said. “When he heard that the guards were coming toward his cell, he thought they were coming to beat him again, so he slit his wrists.”
Terekhin was scheduled to complete his nine-year term for a nonviolent offense in 2015. Instead, he has remained in prison in pretrial detention. He has told activists that he has personally been subjected to torture and beating repeatedly during his time at IK-6.
“They picked Terekhin because he maintained active contact with [rights monitors],” activist Trufanova said. “He was one of the few who refused to recant his allegations.”
Charges of the rampant abuse of convicts in Russian prisons have again made headlines in Russia. Opposition activist Ildar Dadin last month published an open letter detailing torture and abuse at the prison where he is being held in Karelia.
“It is a system of torture,” said Trufanova. “And it still exists across the whole country. What happened in Kopeisk is exactly word-for-word what Dadin is saying.”


di Robert Coalson e Aleksandr Valiyev per "Radio Free Liberty"

MAFIA CAPITALE... NUOVI INDAGATI.... Un nuova ondata di richieste di rinvio a giudizio per la maxi inchiesta Mafia capitale. E' l'ultima tranche che chiude il cerchio su funzionari, carabinieri e politici infedeli che, stando all'istruttoria della pubblica accusa, si sono lasciati comprare dalla holding di Buzzi e Carminati. Ventiquattro nomi, molti dei quali già presenti nel processo madre, a cui sono associati nuovi episodi. La new entry è Francesco D'Ausilio, ex capogruppo del Pd al Campidoglio e il suo capo segreteria Salvatore Nucera a cui i pubblici ministeri Luca Tescaroli e Giuseppe Cascini, e gli aggiunti Paolo Ielo e Michele Prestipino, contestano corruzione e atti contrari ai doveri d'ufficio......




Federica Angeli per “roma.repubblica.it”
 
PROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALEPROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALE
Un nuova ondata di richieste di rinvio a giudizio per la maxi inchiesta Mafia capitale. E' l'ultima tranche che chiude il cerchio su funzionari, carabinieri e politici infedeli che, stando all'istruttoria della pubblica accusa, si sono lasciati comprare dalla holding di Buzzi e Carminati. Ventiquattro nomi, molti dei quali già presenti nel processo madre, a cui sono associati nuovi episodi.

La new entry è Francesco D'Ausilio, ex capogruppo del Pd al Campidoglio e il suo capo segreteria Salvatore Nucera a cui i pubblici ministeri Luca Tescaroli e Giuseppe Cascini, e gli aggiunti Paolo Ielo e Michele Prestipino, contestano corruzione e atti contrari ai doveri d'ufficio.

Nella richiesta di rinvio a giudizio i magistrati sostengono che i due per "facilitare sul piano politico istituzionale l'aggiudicazione delle procedure negoziate indette dal Dipartimento Tutela Ambiente" si sono spesi in "dieci procedure negoziate riservate alle cooperative sociali e riferite a 10 lotti". In cambio, si legge ancora nelle carte "ricevevano la promessa di corresponsione del 5% del valore dei lotti assegnati con le 10 procedure negoziate citate".

PROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALEPROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALE
Ancora: "D'Ausilio, nella sua qualità di componente del consiglio comunale capogruppo Pd, dunque pubblico ufficiale e Nucera, nella sua qualità di capo staff, per porre la loro funzione al servizio dei soggetti economici del gruppo Buzzi ricevevano la somma di almeno 12mila e 240 euro, senza la deliberazione dell'organo sociale competente né l'iscrizione in bilancio".

Accuse gravi (oltre alla corruzione anche l'aggravante di aver agito per agevolare l'associazione di tipo mafioso diretta da Carminati) e richiesta di rinvio a giudizio per Giampaolo De Pascali, appuntato dei carabinieri in servizio alla Presidenza della Repubblica, ufficio centrale dei servizi di sicurezza, che passava informazioni al ras delle coop sui procedimenti in corso in procura, e per il direttore di un ristorante di via veneto Giovanni Tinozzi che aveva fatto conoscere il carabiniere a Buzzi.
buzzi carminatiBUZZI CARMINATI

Nuove contestazioni anche per l'ex direttore generale di Ama, Giovanni Fiscon  per cui il pool dell'Antimafia ha chiesto il rinvio a giudizio per corruzione e per 4 nuove turbative d'asta scoperte (in concorso con Salvatore Buzzi, Franco Panzironi) e Franco Cancelli, manager della cooperativa sociale Edera, già interdetta dal prefetto Gabrielli per mafia. Gare "turbate" per appalti sull'emergenza rifiuti, una aggiudicata il 5 dicembre del 2012, una dell'11 dicembre 2012 (raccolta foglie), una del 31 luglio 2013 (con base d'asta di 5milioni di euro) e l'ultima del 30 settembre 2013 (sulla raccolta differenziata del multimateriale).

Fiscon agevolava Buzzi ricevendo "utilità consistite nell'organizzare in sede di consiglio comunale e di giunta consenso politico attraverso i consiglieri Coratti, D'Ausilio, Ozzimo e l'interlocuzione col deputato Umberto Marroni, necessario alla riconferma di Fiscon nel ruolo di Dg Ama, a fronte di una iniziativa del sindaco che intendeva disporne la sostituzione".
FRANCESCO D'AUSILIOFRANCESCO D'AUSILIO

Ancora guai per la ex brigatista Nadia Cerrito, Salvatore Buzzi ed Emilio Gammuto, tutti imputati nel processo principale arrivato alla sua 152esima udienza, a cui stavolta sono contestate dazioni di denaro a politici per consentire "all'organizzazione di stampo mafioso diretta da Carminati di avere utilità".

Richiesta di rinvio a giudizio anche per Brigidina Paone, che in qualità di collaboratrice all'assessorato alla Casa, "per il compimento di atti contrari ai doveri d'ufficio consistenti nel promuovere in assemblea capitolina, anche attraverso emendamenti e deliberazioni intese a garantire consistenti sconti e legittimazioni all'acquisto alle onlus, tra le quali rientravano le cooperative facenti capo a Buzzi, in sede di dismissione del patrimonio immobiliare del Comune". Favori in cambio dell'assunzione della figlia nella 29 Giugno.
BUZZI CARMINATIBUZZI CARMINATI

C'è anche Stefano Venditti, presidente della lega della cooperative Lazio, nella lista dei 24, Marco Bruera, stretto collaboratore di Odevaine che in occasione della gara per il cara di Mineo "curava la predisposizione della documentazione fittizia finalizzata a giustificare l'ingresso delle somme nelle casse delle fondazioni e delle società riferibili a Odevaine" e Clelia Logorelli, dirigente preposta al settore del verde in Eur spa.

Ancora: contestata la corruzione anche a funzionari della pubblica amministrazione Alfredo Romani, responsabile dell'ufficio immigrazione del Dipartimento Politiche Sociali, Gaetano Altamura, dirigente del X Dipartimento che in cambio dell'assunzione di sue due nipoti ha concesso affidamento di lavori a Buzzi e soci, Rossana Calistri, componente della commissione di aggiudicazione gare per la manutenzione del verde nelle ville storiche di Roma (ovviamente assegnate a Buzzi) e Fabio Tancredi, direttore del X Dipartimento Tutela Ambiente e della protezione civile di Roma.

Infine gli imprenditori Flavio Ciambella, Fabrizio Amore, Gabriella Errico e Maurizio Marotta (quest'ultimo direttore generale e presidente della cooperativa Capodarco). Anche per il sindaco di Sant'Oreste Sergio Menichelli e di due funzionari del Comune Marco Placidi e Raniero Lucci, è stato chiesto il rinvio a giudizio per turbativa d'asta.


PROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALEPROCESSO MAFIA CAPITALE